Children’s Teeth

Caring for your children's teeth. Get an early start.

We like to see children at the practice and encourage them to come in from an early age for checkups. We try to make this a pleasant experience for them. Charlotte Rademeyer, is our resident dentist with an interest in Peadiatric Dentistry.
Small boy brushing his teeth

Your child’s mouth will be assessed for dental caries ( decay) and early signs of crowding. Where appropriate a referral will be made to a specialist orthodontist to align the teeth using fixed bands (‘train tracks’) or using the new Invisalign technique.

Children's first teeth  start coming through between 3 and 6 months. By the age of 3yrs they should have all 20 deciduous (milk) teeth present. Children's teeth need to be brushed twice a day using a fluoride toothpaste appropriate for their age, using a ‘pea sized' amount.

What are Fissures?

Fissures are grooves found in the chewing surfaces of back teeth. They are difficult to keep clean so there is more risk of decay.

Fissures can be sealed with tough plastic to protect them. The plastic is runny at first but sets hard usually when a light is shined on them.sealants may be tooth-coloured or see-through. They are normally only used for children and only on permanent teeth.

Children's Teeth and Fissure Sealants.

Your dentist will discuss whether your child needs sealants. This will depend on:

  • the shape of the tooth
  • how much a child's teeth have already decayed.
  • a child's general health (because general health problems can make it especially
    important to avoid dental problems.)


The treatment is painless, involving only dabbing a mild acid onto the tooth, washing it off, applying the sealant before curing it with a bright light.
Fissure sealants protect teeth from decay and can last for years. Or, if they fall out,they can usually be replaced if there is no decay underneath.

Contact us to learn more about Children's Teeth and Fissure Sealants.

INJURIES TO CHILDREN'S TEETH

If children damage their ‘milk teeth' in an accident there is not usually anything that can be done. Loss of the milk tooth may cause some space loss for the second tooth but this can normally be rectified orthodontically when the child is older.

Trauma to the ‘second teeth' (adult dentition) is more serious. Fractured or chipped teeth can usually be easily repaired using modern adhesive dentistry techniques. Fractures through the nerve of the tooth cause complications.

It is important  that you take your child to the dentist as soon as possible to have the injury assessed.

If an adult tooth is completely knocked out in an accident or loosened it can sometimes be saved. It should be washed, being careful to hold the top of the tooth (crown) and it  can then be stored in milk or saline solution until the dentist can be visited as soon as possible.

It may be possible to reimplant the tooth and splint it to the adjacent teeth.

TOOTH DECAY.

Sugars in food and drinks provide food for bacteria in the mouth to use for their metabolism. Acid is produced by the bacteria as a by product and it is this acid that breaks down the calcified tooth material causing decay or ‘dental caries' as it is known.

 

For further information visit the Oral Health Foundation.

Saliva washes away  food debris and neutralises this plaque acid. However if there is a frequent eating of ‘sweets', the saliva does not have the time to neutralise the plaque acid. If sweets or eaten then ideally it should be close to meal times to reduce the number of sugar spikes.

Clean teeth at least twice daily especially at bedtime as there is a reduced flow of saliva  during sleep.

Children’s examinations are free below the age of 13 if the parents are also our patients. Between 13 to 17 yrs of age the examination fee is £22. We also give concessions to students.

There is a £20 registration/ examination fee for young children who are New Patients and £30 registration for New Patients aged between 13 and 18 yrs of age.

Please contact us or call us on 01628 474044 or you can email us at enquiries@bridge-dental.co.uk.